oblivion

The Backlog: The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

With Skyrim I decided to take a different approach. Instead of putting 10 hours in and then adding a few mods here and there, I figured I should just mod it straight out of the gate. Before I even booted the game for the first time, I had a handful of modifications downloaded and installed. But then things started to get out of control. 10 mods became 20. 20 became 40. Soon I had nearly 80 mods installed, changing everything from the density of the grass to the speed arrows fly to granting my dragon-souled warrior the ability to call for his last horse. But it wasn’t until I installed the amazing rendition of The Dragonborn Comes by Malukah as the menu music that things started to go sideways (she also does a killer version of Misty Mountains from The Hobbit).

The Backlog: The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Linearity in Games Isn't Necessarily a Bad Thing

Recently here on Darkstation, an article was posted about if shooters are growing stale and predictable, and in both the article and the comments, it was echoed that people were all tired of the same thing- linearity. A lot of people seem to be of the opinion that linearity is a harmful thing in and of itself (and not just in this article), and that things get old quickly if they don't have branching paths, choices, or an open world. Linearity isn't necessarily horrible, though, and it's easy to lose what you're trying to do with a game by shoving in unnecessary open-world elements, and it can go as far as hurting the overall quality of an otherwise great game.

Linearity in Games Isn't Necessarily a Bad Thing