3DS eShop

Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology Review

The original Radiant Historia for the Nintendo DS was a hard-to-find game released near the end of the portable system’s life. The title has found a new home on the Nintendo 3DS as Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology, adding a new what-if timeline, dungeon, and quality of life improvements. As a “definitive edition,” the game is well-suited for new players, but my big question was whether this upgrade was enough to warrant a replay.

Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology Review

Bye-Bye BoxBoy! Review

If you haven’t experienced the BoxBoy! series and can only pick one, Bye-Bye BoxBoy! has the most variety, providing the most value. Otherwise, picking up the whole trilogy is a great solution for anyone seeking ingenious portable puzzles in bulk. Bye-Bye, BoxBoy! We’ll miss you!

Bye-Bye BoxBoy! Review

Punch Club Review

Punch Club is only for the most hardcore micromanagers who don’t mind the long, grueling road to fighter stardom. It’s challenging, but it manages to replicate the hardships of real fighters, who constantly toil against vicious diminished growths, but then achieve amazing feats in the ring.

Punch Club Review

Shift DX Review

Shift DX takes one premise and remarkably makes it last for 200+ levels. Its healthy mix of spatial reasoning and platforming obstacles effectively tests your mind and reflexes. I’m convinced that this game stimulates a part of your brain that you rarely use, and it feels great. If you are even a casual fan of puzzle platformers, Shift DX will turn your world upside-down.

Shift DX Review

Steamworld Heist

Steamworld Heist is a ton of fun, and developer Image and Form are doing a great job of trying new things following the surprise success of Steamworld Dig. Perhaps a little on the easier side, it makes up for it by being a great playing and superbly produced tactics game with a lot of character, and loads or replayability. It's going to be ported over to other systems soon, but the 3DS version is fantastic, and you owe it to yourself to pick it up for some on-the-go bot blasting.

Steamworld Heist

Weapon Shop de Omasse

You get a sense that if they had focused more on one of the mechanics or the other, they’d have made a better game; it was just too difficult to balance. But the idea of an interactive sitcom is kind of novel, and the writing is fine enough that in the spots you can actually read it, you can get a good bit of entertainment out of it. I just wish that I had more chances, or more to do with the weapons. But you don’t really get either, and you just get a middling game that has two clear ways it could have been better, but the inability to give priority to one.

Weapon Shop de Omasse

Heavy Fire: Black Arms 3D

It's a game of cheap hits and endlessly replaying levels because you couldn't dodge or react to a bullet in any way. There's no real story, your character doesn't matter, weapon progression feels pointless, and the concept of an on-rails shooter on a 3DS using the touch screen to aim can be done well, but isn't here. Even worse, it requires you to play through old levels before you can advance, and these are not levels you WANT to replay. In fact, this isn't the kind of game you want to play period. It's the kind of game that's clearly trying to trade off on looking like better ones, but it just reminds you that you don't want to be playing this one.

Heavy Fire: Black Arms 3D

Dillon's Rolling Western: The Last Ranger

The difficulty of having Tower Defense and RTS games where you have a central avatar seems obvious: you need to be omnipotent on the battlefield, but these games limit you too much to really be enjoyable. Instead of zooming over, you must saunter. Giving orders can only be done to specific units who are close enough to you. And if you spend time splitting between two severely different genres, it’s unlikely those two are ever going to come together in the way you want. It’s a lesson Dillon’s Rolling Western: The Last Crusade could have used: it’s not always good to be genre-straddling, especially when you do it in a way that leaves both your genres hamstrung and uninteresting.

Dillon's Rolling Western: The Last Ranger

Kersploosh!

The best way I could recommend Kersploosh! would be to have a friend or two with a 3DS agree to buy the game as well. Turn on StreetPass, so every time you see each other after playing, you’re updating your scores and challenging each other indirectly. It’s something you’ll want to do, as well, even if it's a little bit of an unrealistic thing to ask in order to make this game fun. Kersploosh! is a fun, if brief, game.

Kersploosh!

Johnny Impossible

With more polish and more work, this game could have been fun. Instead, it’s a grossly frustrating game, too focused on dated mechanics and a misguided stealth element for it to be entertaining. And a timer on every little thing? I get the idea that it might help create tension, but it just winds up being frustrating when it’s ever-present like it is in Johnny Impossible.

Johnny Impossible

Fluidity: Spin Cycle

Originally released on the Nintendo’s Wiiware service in 2010, some light research has discovered that Spin Cycle is simply a 3DS port that uses the handheld in lieu of the Wiimote. The lack of any 3D effects combined with the awkward use of handing the 3DS makes the product feel somewhat slap dashed. However, I’d be more upset about that if a) I played the original game and b) didn’t find the gameplay experience and puzzle design so enjoyable.

Fluidity: Spin Cycle