Bethesda Softworks

Prey Review

It is difficult to overstate what an achievement Prey's environmental and gameplay designs represent, nor the elegance and real ingenuity behind the many interlocking systems that the player accesses throughout. Whether you approach it as a horror-action game, a stealth-puzzle game or a run-and-gun shooter, Prey will accommodate you. Although it lacks narrative drive or memorable characters, Prey will engage you for hours as you realize the potential for creativity that the developers baked in to every area and moment in the game. 

Prey Review

Fallout 4

Fallout 4 is a good game, an absolutely solid work horse of a title that will, if you let it, carry you away for hours at a time to explore its depths. At a time when titles seem to be losing content, Fallout 4 has more then you can possibly consume all at once, and its host of options mean that when you come back for a second, third, or ninth pass, the experience can actually, honestly, be something different.

Fallout 4

The Evil Within: The Consequence

The Consequence is entertaining. It's not an introspective, philosophical mindbender; it's campy fun. It has its flaws, but in a game where Claude Debussy's "Claire De Lune" is mixed with Inception, buckets of blood, and a Victorian loveseat/black cat combo that acts as your save point, I can't help but enjoy it.

The Evil Within: The Consequence

The Evil Within

The Evil Within is a game that the survival horror genre desperately needed. Recent horror games have seem to forgotten simple mechanics that makes the genre so unique. The Evil Within is the perfect example of the old cliche "If it ain't broke, don't fix it". Shinji Mikami and Tango Gameworks does just that. Even with a plot that never meets its potential, the beautifully designed enemies, superb gameplay and terrifying environments all come together to give horror fans a fascinating, memorable experience.

The Evil Within

Elder Scrolls Online

Elder Scrolls Online is about as middle of the road as an MMO can get. It fails in some spectacular places for a multiplayer-based game, and in the same way I questioned what Zenimax was thinking when they announced it in the first place, I question just how long they'll be able to hold out before flipping the switch from paid subscription to free to play. In order to review this, I was gifted 60 days of playtime, which, as I finish writing this, has run it's course. While I don't regret my time in Tamriel, I think the most damning piece of criticism I can deliver is that I do not plan to re-up on my subscription. 60 days was more then enough time for me to determine that I would rather spend my time elsewhere.

Elder Scrolls Online