Double Fine Productions

Gang Beasts Review

The concept of Gang Beasts is pretty easy to follow. You and three other local players, or seven for online play, are pitted against each other in a contest to see who can be the last one standing. There are no weapons with which to murder each other. Instead, each match challenges players to see who can be the best at punching someone’s lights out and tossing them out of the arena.

Gang Beasts Review

Headlander

Coming in at around six hours for a pretty thorough playthrough, Headlander was an absolute delight. A true experience for the senses, its unique world easily outweighs the few moments of difficulty presented by slightly stiff controls. As they would say in the Pleasure Dome “Stop by for the Robot Dances/Stay for the Butt Plug Jungle Room.” (They don’t say this anywhere in the Pleasure Dome)

Headlander

140

Despite how short the game is, it maybe emphasizes why the other games use this idea to break it up - the concept never really evolves or grows in any way, and with the platforming so basic, there's really not much else here to dig into. It winds up being a rhythm game with disposable musical elements, a platformer with uninteresting mechanics.

140

Day of the Tentacle: Remastered

Day of the Tentacle: Remastered is the next game in a long line of successful updates from Double Fine, and it does a lot to show that adventure games still have a place in the growing library of games and genres.

Day of the Tentacle: Remastered

Broken Age Act I

Between its story, flavorful presentation, and adequate point-and-click gameplay, there is a lot to like with this episode of Broken Age. It has the makings of a classic. If it fulfills its potential, we may speak of it in ten years with the same reverence of which we speak other Tim Shafer classics like Psychonauts and Grim Fandango.

Broken Age Act I