PC Puzzle

CrossCode Review

CrossCode is the very definition of a passion project as it was painstakingly developed over a span of seven years, and it really shows. The game is filled to the brim with content, including a lengthy story campaign, diverse enemy designs, and many side quests. It really has a lot of bang for your buck.

CrossCode Review

Candleman: The Complete Journey Review

The player takes the role of a walking candle in the search of meaning in a lonely, dark world.  Our small, sentient candle explores a variety of levels filled with platforming and puzzles. It’s a strange premise that lacks any ground in realism, but it works if you think of it as a children’s storybook.

Candleman: The Complete Journey Review

Figment Review

Figment is not a point and click adventure game, but it certainly eschews a lot of the same sensibilities and gameplay concepts. You do not actually point and click, but the gameplay style is very reminiscent of old-school adventure-styled games like Sam and Max and Broken Age.

Figment Review

Imprint-X Review

Imprint-X has style and that goes a long way in terms of making the game stand out. Without its look and without its music it really is just a simplistic game about clicking to solve puzzles. Solving the puzzles provides a sense of accomplishment at times but overall there is no greater purpose or reason to solve them other than the game wants you to.

Imprint-X Review

Human: Fall Flat

I really can’t think of a person who wouldn’t enjoy this game on some level. If you're a fan of puzzle platforming or physical comedy, grab Human: Fall Flat right now.

Human: Fall Flat

The Talos Principle: Road to Gehenna

Its gameplay is still rock solid, the level design is impressive, and the highs that you get from solving a puzzle are still there. It's still a game that succeeds at a basic level. It just doesn’t provide the unforgettable, lasting, and profound experience that made The Talos Principle such an unforgettable experience.

The Talos Principle: Road to Gehenna

The Talos Principle

The game prospers not only from immense creativity, but from a devotion to the unsexy fundamentals of great game design. That devotion pays off with a long, unforgettable experience that almost never fails to engage you and has virtually no weak points. It's a game that constantly entices you to see what the next puzzle or story bit has to offer. In that regard, it rarely disappoints, and the experience stays with you long after you finish it.

The Talos Principle

The Counting Kingdom

As an educational tool it's pretty solid and a great way to get kids to learn and practice their math homework, but as a game it's just... not amazing. It didn't cause me pain and I didn't regret playing it which is more than I can say for some other titles, but aside from the general fun I had lining things up for a massive 43 spell streak, there just wasn't much to it. It's a solid educational tool,but lacks any real depth as a game. Good, but not much else to really think about.

The Counting Kingdom

Road Not Taken

Road Not Taken’s roguelike structure works against the rest of the game’s design and ultimately makes playing into a tedious, repetitive experience. On the surface there’s a lot to love in the game’s charming presentation, but repeated playthroughs reveal a failure to implement the variation and unpredictability that make rougelikes great.

Road Not Taken

So Many Me

t has beautifully composed melodies that remind me of the old Rayman games: Serene and environmental. Every world counts with its own sonorous accompaniment that helps the backgrounds blend together and complement the experience. The story, although with its own blend of silliness, is enjoyable and finishes properly. From a gameplay point of view however, I would not replay it simply because of its consistently aggravating tendency to force you into redoing every puzzle after making unintentional mistakes.

So Many Me

Munin

Regardless, the game can be fun and unique in spite of its flaws. If you’re looking for something to turn on occasionally and give you a good brain tease, then you might be satisfied with Munin. If you’re looking for something you can sink your teeth into and walk away from with fond memories, I’m afraid that Munin is as ephemeral as feather on the wind.

Munin