XB1 Puzzle

Illusion: A Tale of the Mind Review

Young Emma finds herself chained up inside her father’s mind. What has happened? Why is she there? To find out the truth behind her predicament, she embarks on a puzzle adventure with her soft toy rabbit Topsy over a surreal and disjointed landscape, formed together from her father’s experiences.

Illusion: A Tale of the Mind Review

Nightmares from the Deep 2: The Siren's Call

It's also a great stress relief. The game makes you forget your mundane worries for the time spent on weather-beaten alleys and hidden rooms of Kingsmouth.

Nightmares from the Deep 2: The Siren's Call

Superhot

Superhot's time manipulation is a fun mechanic that allows you to play a first person shooter in a way you couldn't elsewhere. Despite a few shortcomings, the game does a superb job of mixing the first person shooter genre and puzzle games into entertaining experience.

Superhot

Bridge Constructor

There is little margin for playing around to find what works, and what doesn't, and there's certainly no room for 'fun.' In fact, as much as I hate to say it, the hardest challenge in this game is forcing yourself to try and keep playing it.

Bridge Constructor

The Swapper

Facepalm Games has created a fantastic puzzle-platformer and coupled it with a story that not only delivers but makes the player questions their own morals even after the credits roll. This is the type of absorbing experience that great games are build upon.

The Swapper

The Escapists

The Escapists is a unique experience in the games industry, and for that reason alone it’s worth giving a shot. However, this isn’t a game that attempts to slide by on novelty alone. There’s real depth and real heart to the game, and even if you have to fight and fail multiple times to discover it, you’ll end up with a funny story to share with your friends for each time that you die. In that way, The Escapists stands among the best sandbox games of the new generation.

The Escapists

Never Alone

Never Alone never has that transcendental moment where the player can momentarily look past the game and see the world of the Inupiat. Instead, that world feels burdened with the task of being the appealing kernel of a heavily flawed machine. There's a land of wondrous play and exploration somewhere in this premise, but Never Alone isn't it.

Never Alone