roguelike

Dead Cells Review

Dead Cells is like an unholy hybrid of The Binding of Isaac and Dark Souls, with the skill-based combat of the latter merged with the unforgiving structure of the former. As much as Dead Cells tries - and largely succeeds - to make some concessions to wider accessibility, it is still a game for players with patience and tolerance.

Dead Cells Review

The Swords of Ditto Review

Did you ever notice that time limits placed on anything fun - a vacation, for instance - might make you savor the experience but they're also kind of a bummer? Likewise, not having enough time to prepare for something important can also be a drag. Although it's not the first game to impose a timer on the action, The Swords of Ditto begins with the premise that its hero has four in-game days to prepare for the big showdown with the boss, a witch named Mormo. It isn't much time.

The Swords of Ditto Review

Into the Breach Review

To anyone who suggests that video games need to be lavish productions with infinitely complex systems, bleeding edge graphics, and cinematic stories, I suggest taking a look at Subset Games' Into the Breach. This follow-up to the wildly successful FTL is, like chess, a seemingly simple little strategy game that hides a fantastic amount of thoughtful gameplay that is as addictive and challenging as it is spare.

Into the Breach Review

Let It Die Review

Coming at the end of a very impressive gaming year, Let It Die can't help but suffer in comparison to a whole bunch of other, more burnished titles. Still, the game's excellent action combat, weirdness, and variety of weapons give it just enough character to stand out and make it worthy of attention. The pay-to-win aspect is a bummer, and there is overall a sense of things being not quite solid, but anyone who's enjoyed other Grasshopper Manufacture games will enjoy this one as well. 

Let It Die Review

Heart&Slash

Though the camera is often problematic and those looking for a story-driven experience will likely be disappointed, Heart&Slash still presents a detailed and delightful world as well as a surprisingly deep gameplay experience. For a game without a single living thing in its world, it has a lot of heart.

Heart&Slash

Nuclear Throne

I had a lot of fun learning the ins and outs of each character and weapon and, like a good fighting game, I found the character I’m going to stick with. I played many hours of Nuclear Throne and I expect it to be the game I come back to the most in 2016. Nuclear Throne knows what it is and makes no bones about it. It’s a difficult, stylized roguelike with a clear vision of what it’s trying to achieve. Everything from the unique art style to the tough-as-nails gameplay makes it a rollercoaster of emotions whether you’re playing it for 15 minutes or 15 hours.

Nuclear Throne

Rogue Legacy

Rogue Legacy bridges the gap between the old classics of the SNES days and newer indie titles of this generation. Its old-school graphical look and amazing soundtrack mesh with its clever gameplay concepts to create something truly unique. While boss battles can create a bit of a grind and the occasional glitch is fairly noticeable, I truly enjoyed my time with Rogue Legacy. Its fluid mix of combat, platforming, and smart humor made me enjoy each of my 100+ run throughs just as much as any other. After spending nearly 20 hours with the game I can honestly say I’d love to jump right back in, if only to conquer the castle just once more.

Rogue Legacy